The Place of the Old Testament in the Formation of New Testament Theology

Asked: Please evaluate the following quote from Prof. Lindars.
The New Testament writers do not take an Old Testament book or passage and ask, “What does this mean?” They are concerned with the kerygma, which they need to teach and to defend and to understand themselves. Believing

that Christ is the fulfillment of the promises of God, and that they are living in the age to which all the Scriptures refer, they employ the Old Testament in an ad hoc way, making recourse to it just when and how they find it helpful for their purposes. But they do this in a highly creative situation, because the Christ-event breaks through conventional expectations, and demands new patterns of exegesis for its elucidation.”
Source: Barnabas Lindars, “The Place of the Old Testament in the Formation of New Testament Theology: Prolegomena,” NTS 23 (1976): 59-66.

My Answer: I will only my comment on the beginning of the quote due to time.
“The New Testament writers do not take an Old Testament book or passage and ask, “What does this mean?”
Paul, Christ, the writer of Hebrews did not do this? They seem to have known and asked them selves in a number of what the Old Testament passages meant. Paul being taught before, Christ himself knowing them entirely and all the disciples being Jews knew the Old testament and yes did ask themselves time and time again what things looked like. Paul in Galatians, the writer of Hebrews in dealing with what he did in his long sermon. The interpreter never conveys that there must be a new way of understanding in the Old Testament passage, but its’ message can bee seen as if there is more understanding to the whole scheme of redemption, once the revelation has been shown in the New Testament.

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